How to walk with high heels in the snow

posted in: Blog, Boots, Elegant, Everyday, How to | 1
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How to walk with high heels in the snow
Image credit: Flickr (CC) / m00by

Walking with high heels in the snow is probably the biggest footwear challenge of them all. It is doable, though, when you know a few vital tips.

Usually high heels and snow do not mix together well. Some may even say, they don’t mix together at all. They do, but it requires extra effort and the knowledge of some additional tips.

That, combined with, some proper preparation. Actually can make you a high heel master even in snow. Usually the snow is not the culprit, but the ice beneath the snow. So this is why for a start, you should either pick paths that are well cleared from ice, have sand or salt on them for additional grip. If such are not present, then opt for a slightly deeper snow which will give you more grip and make it easier to walk. Otherwise, you risk something like this:

And she was lucky she didn’t fall. But this lady here, does manage quite well, even on packed snow:

If you look closely, you will see that she properly manages to put even weight on the toes and the heel. She also turns her feet slightly to the side when she goes down the hill. Granted, going uphill is a struggle, as she tries to make too wide steps.

The tips work for all kinds of high heels, including normal heels, although boots and booties are the way to go during the winter and especially on the snow. Aim for shoes that fit you perfectly as you need them to be properly attached to your feed so they don’t slip off. Also aim for slightly thicker high heels, which would give you more balance.

If the weather where you live is bad for long periods of time, then look for ice grips or similar accessories. They attach to the toe box and give you even more grip in the snow and ice. An alternative is the classic sanding of the sole, although that won’t really work for very slippery ice with no snow on it.

Finally, there’s nothing wrong in asking for someone to hold your hand and help you through the tricky bit. If you don’t have someone with you, you can always ask a passer by. Most men would be thrilled to help you. If there isn’t anyone around, then take your time, and tackle the tricky spot slowly and carefully.

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